Care recipient (cr) becomes agitated and resistive during bathing or is shy about being helped

Try: Cover the cr with a bath blanket during the bathing process even in the shower uncovering only the body part that is being washed and immediately covering it when finished offer the cr the option of wearing a bathing suit or underwear during bathing if this would lead to more comfort be sure to get the areas covered by the suit or underwear clean as well give the cr a washcloth to hold while bathing even if she or he is not able to actively assist in washing anything as this may allow him or her to feel more in control of the bathing experience while assisting explain to the cr what area you would like to wash next and offer the option of the cr helping if the cr is able

Materials: Bathing suit or underwear bath blanket extra washcloth

Categories: Emotional Psychological, Personal, Mobility, Needs Some Assistance, Needs Much Assistance, Independence, Some Supervision, Maximum Supervision, Cognitive Awareness, Fully Aware, Somewhat Aware

Information: n/a

References: n/a

Keywords: n/a

*This information is listed as a Tip and is not explicitly medically licensed

Care recipient (cr) becomes anxious and agitated because he can’t find his or her bedroom frequently the cr asks where is my room

Try: #show the cr the object that you will place by the door of the cr cr’s room have the cr touch and feel the object as you talk about it #attach the object on the door to the room at the cr cr’s eye level #have all helpers family and friends refer to the object when the cr asks where the room is

Materials: Caregiver with patience and smiles easy-to-recognize object to fix on room door e g ball of yarn

Categories: Emotional Psychological, Some Supervision, Maximum Supervision

Information: n/a

References: n/a

Keywords: n/a

*This information is listed as a Tip and is not explicitly medically licensed

Care recipient (cr) becomes anxious when eating out at a restaurant with other dinner guests even old friends

Try: #to alleviate the cr cr’s anxiety drive past the restaurant and point it out to the cr go inside and pick up a copy of the menu to bring home depending on the restaurant the staff may be able to give you a copy of the take-out menu or make a copy of an actual menu #if the cr is concerned about how comfortable the restaurant will be call or visit ahead of time to confirm that the staff can meet any of the cr cr’s special needs ask questions about bathrooms seating and space for wheelchairs or walkers if these are concerns #once home go over the menu choices so the cr can make a dinner selection ahead of time #look at recent pictures of people you are meeting for dinner to refresh the cr cr’s memory of the other guests talk about the past and current lives of other guests so the cr can participate in the conversation at dinner #reassure the cr that the dinner will be pleasant #consider taking a camera to the dinner to take a picture of the group the photo will be a nice memento and a possible aid in recalling the event later

Materials: Copy of the menu from restaurant vehicle restaurant photos of other guests who will be dining with the cr camera

Categories: Emotional Psychological, Social

Information: n/a

References: n/a

Keywords: n/a

*This information is listed as a Tip and is not explicitly medically licensed

Care recipient (cr) is losing the ability to use utensils and becomes belligerent when caregivers attempt to help the cr eat

Try: Offer finger foods at mealtime soups can be put into mugs and the cr can drink them also eating finger foods will not require utensils and therefore should require less help from the caregiver give gestures and visual cues insteaof physical help be sure to complement the cr on how well he or she is doing

Materials: Finger foods examples sandwich cut into quarters chicken legs fish sticks fruit cut into pieces cheese cubes tater tots mugs soups

Categories: Emotional Psychological, Feeding Eating, Some Supervision, Maximum Supervision, Good Vision, So-So Vision

Information: n/a

References: n/a

Keywords: n/a

*This information is listed as a Tip and is not explicitly medically licensed

As memory loss progresses the relationship with your spouse or partner who has memory loss will change; however your connection can still be rich and…

Try: As memory loss progresses the relationship with your spouse or partner who has memory loss will change; however your connection can still be rich and fulfilling spend time together in ways that bring you closer and help you relate you may find yourself taking on a new role in your relationship as your partner partner’s memory declines the person with memory loss may no longer be able to perform certain tasks such as balancing the checkbook doing the taxes handling financial and legal matters and doing certain household chores making important decisions on your own may feel overwhelming be prepared for these changes locate financial and legal documents such as life insurance policies property deeds and retirement accounts soon after your loved one is diagnosed turn to family friends professionals or community resources for assistance as needed intimacy you may be feeling enormous grief over the changes in your relationship you are not selfish for experiencing these feelings given your partner partner’s cognitive decline you may no longer be able to have the same emotional or physical intimacy that you once shared it is typical that people with memory loss experience changes in their sexual drive depression along with physcal illness and some medications can cause a reduced interest in sex it is also common for caregivers to lose sexual desire due to the demands of caregiving the transition from intimate partner to caregiver and changes in their partner partner’s personality due to the progression of memory loss do not feel guilty if your sexual attraction to your partner has changed you can find new ways to connect with each other family and friends you may feel socially isolated because your family and friends may have pulled back from your relationship or you have little time to spend with them your family and friends may hesitate to spend time with you and the person with memory loss because they worry about not knowing what to do or say they also may not understand the behavior changes caused by memory loss or might not be able to accept that the cr has dementia take the initiative to contact family and friends and explain that while memory loss has changed your lives in some ways you value their friendship and support consider inviting a few friends or family members over let them know in advance of any physical or emotional changes in the person with memory loss provide them with suggestions about how to communicate with the cr and what activities they might be able to do together information references adapted from www alz org "changes to your relationship" by staff writer no date

Materials: n/a

Categories: Emotional Psychological, Maintenance, Medical Physical, Personal, Sexuality Intimacy, Social, So-So L T Memory, Poor L T Memory, So-So S T Memory, Poor S T Memory

Information: n/a

References: n/a

Keywords: Relationships intimacy family and friends spouse wife husband partner

*This information is listed as a Fact Sheet and is not explicitly medically licensed

When caring for a Care recipient (cr) with a terminal illness at home there may be times when the caregiver needs assistance from other medical…

Try: When caring for a Care recipient (cr) with a terminal illness at home there may be times when the caregiver needs assistance from other medical professionals a caregiver should contact health care professionals if the cr is in pain that is not relieved by the prescribed dose of pain medication shows discomfort such as grimacing or moaning has trouble breathing and seems upset is unable to urinate or empty the bowels has fallen seems depressed or talks about committing suicide has difficulty swallowing medication or refused to take medication in addition the caregiver should call in help anytime he or she is overwhelmed by caring for the cr too upset or afraid to be with the cr or does not know how to handle a situation information references adapted from www agingcare com

Materials: n/a

Categories: Emotional Psychological, Medical Physical

Information: n/a

References: n/a

Keywords: Death near death help

*This information is listed as a Fact Sheet and is not explicitly medically licensed

After the Care recipient (cr) has passed away there is no need to hurry with arrangements family members and caregivers may wish to sit with…

Try: After the Care recipient (cr) has passed away there is no need to hurry with arrangements family members and caregivers may wish to sit with the cr talk or pray when the family is ready the following steps can be taken place the body on its back with one pillow under the head if necessary caregivers or family members may wish to put the cr cr’s dentures or other artificial parts in place if the cr is in a hospice program follow the guidelines provided by the program a caregiver or family member can request a hospice nurse to verify the cr cr’s death contact the appropriate authorities in accordance with local regulations if the cr has requested not to be resuscitated through a do-not-resuscitate dnr order or other mechanism do not call 911 contact the cr cr’s doctor and funeral home when the cr cr’s family is ready call other family members friends and clergy provide or obtain emotional support for family members and friends to help cope with their loss information references adapted from www agingcare com

Materials: n/a

Categories: Emotional Psychological, Medical Physical, Spiritual

Information: n/a

References: n/a

Keywords: Death near death after death

*This information is listed as a Fact Sheet and is not explicitly medically licensed

Certain signs and symptoms can help a caregiver (cg) determine when the Care recipient (cr) is near death some of the more common ones are…

Try: Certain signs and symptoms can help a caregiver (cg) determine when the Care recipient (cr) is near death some of the more common ones are listed below however keep in mind that not every cr experiences all of these signs and symptoms drowsiness increased sleep and or unresponsiveness the cg and family members can plan visits and activities for times when the cr is alert it is important to speak directly to the cr and talk as if he or she can hear even if there is no response most crs are still able to hear after they are no longer able to speak confusion about time place and or identity of loved ones; restlessness; visions of people and places that are not present; pulling at bed linens or clothing gently remind the cr of the time date and people who are with them decreased socialization and withdrawal caused by decreased oxygen to the brain decreased blood flow and mental preparation for dying speak to the cr directly let the cr know you are there for them the individual may be aware and able to hear but unable to respond decreased need for food and fluids and loss of appetite caused by the body body’s need to conserve energy and its decreasing ability to use food and fluids properly allow the cr to choose if and when to eat or drink ice chips water or juice may be refreshing if the cr can swallow keep the cr cr’s mouth and lips moist with products such as glycerin swabs and lip balm loss of bladder or bowel control caused by the relaxing of muscles in the pelvic area keep the patient as clean dry and comfortable as possible place disposable pads on the bed beneath the patient and remove them when they become soiled darkened urine or decreased amount of urine caused by slowing of kidney function and or decreased fluid intake caregivers can consult a member of the patient patient’s health care team about the need to insert a catheter to avoid blockage a member of the health care team can teach the caregiver how to take care of the catheter if one is needed skin becomes cool to the touch particularly the hands and feet; skin may become bluish in color especially on the underside of the body caused by decreased circulation to the extremities blankets can be used to warm the cr although the skin may be cool crs are usually not aware of feeling cold rattling or gurgling sounds while breathing which may be loud; breathing that is irregular and shallow; decreased number of breaths per minute; breathing that alternates between rapid and slow breathing may be easier if the cr cr’s body is turned to the side and pillows are placed beneath the head and behind the back although labored breathing can sound very distressing to the caregiver gurgling and rattling sounds do not cause discomfort to the cr involuntary movements changes in heart rate and loss of reflexes in the legs and arms are additional signs that the end of life is near information references adapted fro www agingcare com

Materials: n/a

Categories: Emotional Psychological, Medical Physical

Information: n/a

References: n/a

Keywords: Death near death

*This information is listed as a Fact Sheet and is not explicitly medically licensed

As the Care recipient (cr) approaches death it can be difficult to think about what will happen if the caregiver is with the cr in…

Try: As the Care recipient (cr) approaches death it can be difficult to think about what will happen if the caregiver is with the cr in his or her final moments determining when the cr passes can be hard here are some of the common signs there is no breathing or pulse the eyes do not move or blink and the pupils are dilated enlarged the eyelids may be slightly open the jaw is relaxed and the mouth is slightly open the body releases the bowel and bladder contents the cr does not respond to being touched or spoken to information references adapted from www agingcare com

Materials: n/a

Categories: Emotional Psychological, Medical Physical

Information: n/a

References: n/a

Keywords: Death near death

*This information is listed as a Fact Sheet and is not explicitly medically licensed

Depression is common in many care recipients crs how do you know that the cr is depressed depression is characterized by symptoms that interfere with…

Try: Depression is common in many care recipients crs how do you know that the cr is depressed depression is characterized by symptoms that interfere with the ability to function normally on a daily basis for several weeks of longer the symptoms of depression my vary the following list includes some of the more common symptoms that the caregiver should look for persistent sadness for two or more weeks difficulty sleeping or concentrating feeling run down and having a low energy level social isolation no longer get pleasure from usual activities worry excessively overly concerned about health problems irritable feel worthless or helpless changes in appetite and or appearance crying spells thoughts of death or suicide information references adapted from www agingcare com

Materials: n/a

Categories: Emotional Psychological, Medical Physical

Information: n/a

References: n/a

Keywords: Depression signs of depression

*This information is listed as a Fact Sheet and is not explicitly medically licensed